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House Passes Build Back Better Act with Jacobs' Provision on Child Care

Legislation includes Jacobs’ provision to expand child care funding to benefit more middle-class families

Washington, D.C. - The House has passed The Build Back Better Act (H.R. 5376). Congresswoman Sara Jacobs (D-CA-53) proudly voted for the bill, which now heads to the Senate. The Build Back Better Act lowers the cost of child care and family care, establishes free and universal pre-k for 3 and 4-year-olds, extends the expanded Child Tax Credit, lowers health care costs, invests in affordable housing, includes the largest investment in combating climate change ever, and is fully paid for by making large corporations and the wealthiest Americans pay their fair share. 


Early Friday morning, Congresswoman Jacobs presided over the House floor from 1:00-5:12 AM as Speaker Pro Tempore. 


Congresswoman Jacobs secured a significant win in the Build Back Better Act. Her request that the child care program be as expansive as possible and include more middle-class families in high-cost areas like San Diego was put into the bill, including the specific eligibility threshold that Jacobs fought for. 


Congresswoman Jacobs releases the following statement: 


“The Build Back Better Act is a big win for San Diego and the entire country. We need an economy that works for everyone, which is why I fought so hard to extend the Child Tax Credit and fought for a strong child care program that will expand eligibility to the majority of families in my district and across San Diego. I want to thank House leadership and the White House for hearing my request that we go big on child care in this bill. Because of my provision on child care, the plan will cover the families of 9 out of 10 young children in California.


“As the youngest member of the California delegation, I am especially excited that this bill helps build a brighter future for our country. The Build Back Better Act lowers costs for the American people on key must-have items like child care, elder care, prescription drugs and health care; invests in affordable housing, fights child hunger, and helps us combat climate change.” 


On October 25, Congresswoman Jacobs wrote to both White House officials and Speaker Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Schumer, calling for expanding eligibility for child care subsidies to a higher income threshold — at least 250% of the State Median Income — to reflect the needs of people in high-cost areas like San Diego. As negotiations began in September, Congresswoman Jacobs also urged Congressman Bobby Scott, Chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor to expand the size of the child care subsidy program. Because of her advocacy, the child care provision will support millions more middle-class families who have struggled to afford child care that meets their needs. According to the White House, the families of 9 out of 10 young children in California will be included in the child care program. 


Key Items in the Build Back Better Act:


Lower Child Care & Family Care Costs

  • Ensures the majority of families will pay no more than 7% of their income for child care

  • Free and universal pre-k for 3 and 4-year-olds

  • Four weeks of paid family leave

  • Extends the expanded Child Tax Credit

  • Expands access to in-home care for older adults and individuals with disabilities

  • Increases Pell Grants

  • Increases funding for affordable housing

  • Increases funding to support childhood hunger programs


Lower Health Care Costs

  • Lowers prescription drug prices and out of pocket pay cap for Medicare Part D

  • Ensures Americans with diabetes pay no more than $35 per month for insulin

  • Expands Affordable Care Act subsidies and lowers costs on marketplaces to help more people purchase coverage

  • Provides hearing coverage in Medicare


Combating Climate Change

  • Provides $555 billion in clean energy and climate investments

  • Includes green tax credits to help families and consumers

  • Creates national Civilian Climate Corps